Discussion:
What would you do if your home was surrounded by flames?
(too old to reply)
Sir Kevin Rudd
2009-02-09 06:48:17 UTC
Permalink
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.

Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.

What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
Coach
2009-02-09 06:57:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I wouldn't be stupid enough to be there in the first place. The days
of relying on the CFA are well and truly over. All they do is protect
their own homes and then go on tv telling the country how good they
are. Yeah, 130 dead and 750 houses totally destroyed - you are VERY
good aren't you? NOT!!!!
GrassyNoel
2009-02-09 07:01:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
Sir Kevin Rudd
2009-02-09 07:20:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.

Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).

I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.

Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)

Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.

Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Coach
2009-02-09 07:24:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Please don't ever try that. If you were there and you did, the death
toll would be one (1) more than it currently is.
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-09 07:30:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...

Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Sir Kevin Rudd
2009-02-09 07:44:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.

Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.

A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside. Not only this but
stone/bricks do not release energy quickly, meaning they would actually
retain the heat, it's one of the reasons people can walk bare foot across
hot rocks in a fire, as the rocks actually retain most of the heat and emit
little into your feet.
Coach
2009-02-09 08:11:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.
Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.
A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside.
Yeah right. This bushfire has been burning for a week, and will
probably burn for another week. If you can hold your breath for a
fortnight then you should be on Australias Got Talent.
h***@gmail.com
2009-02-09 09:52:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Coach
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.
Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.
A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside.
Yeah right. This bushfire has been burning for a week, and will
probably burn for another week. If you can hold your breath for a
fortnight then you should be on Australias Got Talent.
He sure should - with that amount of oxygen-deprivation, his brain-
cell tally is on par with the other contestants.
Carole
2009-02-09 15:38:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come
in,
I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive
for
at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.
Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.
A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside.
Yeah right. This bushfire has been burning for a week, and will
probably burn for another week. If you can hold your breath for a
fortnight then you should be on Australias Got Talent.

Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
h***@gmail.com
2009-02-09 20:25:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Coach
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come
in,
I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive
for
at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.
Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.
A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside.
Yeah right. This bushfire has been burning for a week, and will
probably burn for another week. If you can hold your breath for a
fortnight then you should be on Australias Got Talent.
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?

What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.

No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
GrassyNoel
2009-02-09 23:31:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
That's how fast a fire front can move through a house. The house will
still be burning afterwards.
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-10 01:14:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by GrassyNoel
Post by h***@gmail.com
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
That's how fast a fire front can move through a house. The house will
still be burning afterwards.
...and the chimney with the Darwin Award-winning idiot inside of it is
slap-bang in the centre of the burning house...
Kev
2009-02-10 03:15:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by GrassyNoel
Post by h***@gmail.com
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
That's how fast a fire front can move through a house. The house will
still be burning afterwards.
...and the chimney with the Darwin Award-winning idiot inside of it is
slap-bang in the centre of the burning house...
with a plastic bag taped over his head that held 20 seconds of fresh air
and no water because he poured it all on the ground


Kev
Brad
2009-02-10 04:40:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kev
Post by t***@gmail.com
...and the chimney with the Darwin Award-winning idiot inside of it is
slap-bang in the centre of the burning house...
with a plastic bag taped over his head that held 20 seconds of fresh air
and no water because he poured it all on the ground
Won't need the plastic bag. With a fire of that magnitude consuming
most of the available oxygen he'd asphyxiate any way.

Brad.
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-10 04:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad
Post by Kev
Post by t***@gmail.com
...and the chimney with the Darwin Award-winning idiot inside of it is
slap-bang in the centre of the burning house...
with a plastic bag taped over his head that held 20 seconds of fresh air
and no water because he poured it all on the ground
Won't need the plastic bag. With a fire of that magnitude consuming
most of the available oxygen he'd asphyxiate any way.
No doubt he will be able to think of some genius reason to have a
couple of cans of petrol in the chimney with him as well...
Big LN
2009-02-10 06:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.

Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model house
get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting closer
to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush fire).

You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10 minutes
though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires Victoria is
facing.

CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement at the
front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger. Victoria's fires,
combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air temp, were 20,000 kilowatts
per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever been seen before.

So, take your ill-informed and gutless comments back to ooga-boogaland and
re-bury your head in the sand you brain-dead moron.

No onyas for hebetudinous posters. Dismissed.
^Tems^
2009-02-10 07:27:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of
how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting
closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush
fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10
minutes though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires
Victoria is facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement at
the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger.
Victoria's fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air temp,
were 20,000 kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever been
seen before.
Who is the poor bastard have to go and measure the KpM?
Big LN
2009-02-10 08:26:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by ^Tems^
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of
how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting
closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush
fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10
minutes though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires
Victoria is facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement at
the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger.
Victoria's fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air temp,
were 20,000 kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever been
seen before.
Who is the poor bastard have to go and measure the KpM?
Dunno. Seems to be a new bloke each time?

'Onya
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 07:50:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective
of how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting
closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a
bush fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10
minutes though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires
Victoria is facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement
at the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger.
Victoria's fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air
temp, were 20,000 kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever
been seen before.
With fires of this intensity houses simply explode.
Post by Big LN
So, take your ill-informed and gutless comments back to ooga-boogaland
and re-bury your head in the sand you brain-dead moron.
Well he is a Labor voter..
Post by Big LN
No onyas for hebetudinous posters. Dismissed.
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
Big LN
2009-02-10 08:29:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by blofelds_cat
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of
how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting
closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush
fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10 minutes
though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires Victoria is
facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement at
the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger. Victoria's
fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air temp, were 20,000
kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever been seen before.
With fires of this intensity houses simply explode.
That was my point, Pete. Finally, someone who gets it.

'Onya
Coach
2009-02-10 08:35:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by blofelds_cat
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of
how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting
closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush
fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10 minutes
though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires Victoria is
facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement at
the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger. Victoria's
fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air temp, were 20,000
kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's ever been seen before.
With fires of this intensity houses simply explode.
That was my point, Pete. Finally, someone who gets it.
Isn't it sad when the first moron who "got it" was BlowJobCat? That
doesn't give much hope for the others.
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 12:29:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by blofelds_cat
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective
of how houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model
house get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is
getting closer to the real perspective of what happens to a real
house in a bush fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10
minutes though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires
Victoria is facing.
CFA crews are not allowed to go near a fire if it's heat measurement
at the front is 4,000 kilowatts per metre. That's extreme danger.
Victoria's fires, combined with the 50-100km/hr winds and 46 C air
temp, were 20,000 kilowatts per metre. Nothing, the like, that's
ever been seen before.
With fires of this intensity houses simply explode.
That was my point, Pete. Finally, someone who gets it.
I'm not just a pretty face you know..
Post by Big LN
'Onya
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-10 23:06:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
4) Now get a blow torch about the size of a car and watch your model house
get obliterated.
5) Now get a blowtorch the size of a building....... (This is getting closer
to the real perspective of what happens to a real house in a bush fire).
You were right to question how a house could burn down in 5 to 10 minutes
though. However, it's more like under a minute in the fires Victoria is
facing.
So....a house that burns down *quicker* generates less total heat
energy - is that what you are saying?

Would *you* consider the chimney a safe place to stay in a burning
house?
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-11 05:14:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
I second that auto-nomination.
Post by Big LN
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
Maybe that's how it happens in your fantasy-world.

Let's hear from somebody who was there:

""There was virtually no warning at all. This fire just came through
at such a enormous rate.
"The main (fire) front came straight over, so we ended up getting in
the house and lying on the floor. As soon as that front had come over
we came out.
"The left-hand side of my house, the side gate was on fire with the
flames starting to lick to the eaves."
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/11/2488374.htm

*NOTHING* like your dopey scenario of a house burning "instantly", or
whatever nonsense you were thinking of.
Big LN
2009-02-11 07:28:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes
through
ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
I second that auto-nomination.
Post by Big LN
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
Maybe that's how it happens in your fantasy-world.
""There was virtually no warning at all. This fire just came through
at such a enormous rate.
"The main (fire) front came straight over, so we ended up getting in
the house and lying on the floor. As soon as that front had come over
we came out.
"The left-hand side of my house, the side gate was on fire with the
flames starting to lick to the eaves."
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/11/2488374.htm
*NOTHING* like your dopey scenario of a house burning "instantly", or
whatever nonsense you were thinking of.
Irrelevant, kook.

I'm glad the people in the article weren't at the forefront of one of the
400 inferno fires last weekend. They can count themselves very lucky indeed.
My previous statement that the main fires had an intensity of 20,000 kW/m
was actually an underestimation. It today's Herald Sun, it was reported that
the main inferno's intensities were between 60,000 to 80,000 kW/m (kilowatts
per metre). That is equivalent to 5,000 'Hirsoshima' bombs. Perhaps rather
than trying to belittle the intensity of these disasterous fires, you and
your other dickhead mate could perform the following test:

1) Ask your dickhead mate to set up his ooga-boogaland grass hut next to
your house.
2) Then arrange for 5,000 'Hiroshima' bombs to be dropped on your property.
3) Then check if your property is still slowly burning away after 10 minutes
(as you and Dopey believe) and report your findings back here.

Now, get your head out of the sand and stop pushing your disgusting hidden
agendas.

No onyas for kooks.

Added to my killfile along with your dickhead mate. Dismissed.
Coach
2009-02-11 08:06:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes
through
ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
I second that auto-nomination.
Post by Big LN
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
Maybe that's how it happens in your fantasy-world.
""There was virtually no warning at all. This fire just came through
at such a enormous rate.
"The main (fire) front came straight over, so we ended up getting in
the house and lying on the floor. As soon as that front had come over
we came out.
"The left-hand side of my house, the side gate was on fire with the
flames starting to lick to the eaves."
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/11/2488374.htm
*NOTHING* like your dopey scenario of a house burning "instantly", or
whatever nonsense you were thinking of.
Irrelevant, kook.
I'm glad the people in the article weren't at the forefront of one of the
400 inferno fires last weekend. They can count themselves very lucky indeed.
My previous statement that the main fires had an intensity of 20,000 kW/m
was actually an underestimation. It today's Herald Sun, it was reported that
the main inferno's intensities were between 60,000 to 80,000 kW/m (kilowatts
per metre). That is equivalent to 5,000 'Hirsoshima' bombs. Perhaps rather
than trying to belittle the intensity of these disasterous fires, you and
1) Ask your dickhead mate to set up his ooga-boogaland grass hut next to
your house.
2) Then arrange for 5,000 'Hiroshima' bombs to be dropped on your property.
3) Then check if your property is still slowly burning away after 10 minutes
(as you and Dopey believe) and report your findings back here.
Now, get your head out of the sand and stop pushing your disgusting hidden
agendas.
No onyas for kooks.
Added to my killfile along with your dickhead mate. Dismissed.
I see you insist on having the last word - then put your head in the
sand so you can't hear their side of the debate.
Big LN
2009-02-11 08:40:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big LN
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Big LN
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Carole
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes
through
ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.
Nominated for the Fucking Dickhead of the Year (FDotY) award.
I second that auto-nomination.
Post by Big LN
Listen, Dopey, do a simple test for youself.
1) Make some 10x10cm model houses out of balsa wood.
2) Set one alight and watch it slowly burn (This is your perspective of how
houses burn in a bush fire)
3) Now attack one with a blow torch and watch it get razed quicker.
Maybe that's how it happens in your fantasy-world.
""There was virtually no warning at all. This fire just came through
at such a enormous rate.
"The main (fire) front came straight over, so we ended up getting in
the house and lying on the floor. As soon as that front had come over
we came out.
"The left-hand side of my house, the side gate was on fire with the
flames starting to lick to the eaves."
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/02/11/2488374.htm
*NOTHING* like your dopey scenario of a house burning "instantly", or
whatever nonsense you were thinking of.
Irrelevant, kook.
I'm glad the people in the article weren't at the forefront of one of the
400 inferno fires last weekend. They can count themselves very lucky indeed.
My previous statement that the main fires had an intensity of 20,000 kW/m
was actually an underestimation. It today's Herald Sun, it was reported that
the main inferno's intensities were between 60,000 to 80,000 kW/m (kilowatts
per metre). That is equivalent to 5,000 'Hirsoshima' bombs. Perhaps rather
than trying to belittle the intensity of these disasterous fires, you and
1) Ask your dickhead mate to set up his ooga-boogaland grass hut next to
your house.
2) Then arrange for 5,000 'Hiroshima' bombs to be dropped on your property.
3) Then check if your property is still slowly burning away after 10 minutes
(as you and Dopey believe) and report your findings back here.
Now, get your head out of the sand and stop pushing your disgusting hidden
agendas.
No onyas for kooks.
Added to my killfile along with your dickhead mate. Dismissed.
I see you insist on having the last word - then put your head in the
sand so you can't hear their side of the debate.
So, enlighten us Coach.
What's your views on what happens to a house in the middle of Victoria's
Black Saturday infernos?
Does is slowly burn away like the two (2) morons have suggested, or does it
get obliterated within minutes.
These are the homes in the middle of the 100km/hr, 80,000 kW/m fires we're
talking about, not the lucky ones that were on the edges of these
disasterous fires.
Well, Coach?

Cheers.
ChristianKnight
2009-02-10 09:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come
in,
I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive
for
at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Wrong.
Stone like sand takes a long time to heat up, however once it is hot it
retains the heat.
A bushfire is usually a fast moving front and so would not have enough time
to heat the stone/brick chimney enough to bake me inside.
Yeah right.  This bushfire has been burning for a week, and will
probably burn for another week.  If you can hold your breath for a
fortnight then you should be on Australias Got Talent.
Where does the week come in?
He's talking about protecting himself while the fire front goes through ie
about 5-10 minutes.
Are you people for real?
What kind of house only takes 5-10minutes to burn down?
Even a grass hut in ooga-boogaland will burn for longer than that.
No wonder the death toll is so high, if this is the state of the
nation's intellect.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I wish to take this opportunity to with respect pray that the souls
from those poor dead fire victims find there way to Heaven.
Christ's love
Marty
2009-02-11 04:32:43 UTC
Permalink
I wish to take this opportunity to with respect pray that the souls from
those poor dead fire victims find there way to Heaven. Christ's love
Fuck off with your sickening religious dementia. If you really want to
feel for those people set yourself on fire.
ChristianKnight
2009-02-11 07:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marty
I wish to take this opportunity to with respect pray that the souls from
those poor dead fire victims find there way to Heaven. Christ's love
Fuck off with your sickening religious dementia. If you really want to
feel for those people set yourself on fire.
Silly billy if I set myself on fire then I lose feeling . All feeling.
Total; numb after lots of pain.
What I am saying is if we think sympathetically maybe we can help
channel their dust to building creation, other planets and stars,
flowers and life. Trying to send their souls straight to a black hole
to increase magnitised hate is as doomy as your foul langauge.
Christ's love
Marty
2009-02-11 10:49:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by ChristianKnight
Post by Marty
Post by ChristianKnight
I wish to take this opportunity to with respect pray that the souls
from those poor dead fire victims find there way to Heaven. Christ's
love
Fuck off with your sickening religious dementia. If you really want to
feel for those people set yourself on fire.
Silly billy if I set myself on fire then I lose feeling . All feeling.
Total; numb after lots of pain.
What I am saying is if we think sympathetically maybe we can help
channel their dust to building creation, other planets and stars,
flowers and life. Trying to send their souls straight to a black hole to
increase magnitised hate is as doomy as your foul langauge. Christ's
love
Go back to school fuckwit. You need to learn English.

Coach
2009-02-09 07:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
Yum yum - love the smell of roast long-pig in the morning...
Your idea is crap. For a clue, light a fire *inside* a chimney, then
feel how hot the outside of it gets.
Why not just jump inside a below ground concrete water tank? Of
course that will ONLY work if the CFA volunteers haven't already
stolen your water to protect their own houses. They have a LOT to
answer for.
^Tems^
2009-02-09 08:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
You forgot to add the bricks will block out the sounds of your family
screaming as they burn to death.
Coach
2009-02-09 08:12:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by ^Tems^
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
You forgot to add the bricks will block out the sounds of your family
screaming as they burn to death.
How is the fire going to get IN the fireplace?
Sir Kevin Rudd
2009-02-09 09:46:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by ^Tems^
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival
was
the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
You forgot to add the bricks will block out the sounds of your family
screaming as they burn to death.
How is the fire going to get IN the fireplace?
I think he is making the point that only 1 person at most would be able to
fit into the fireplace.
Swampfox
2009-02-09 09:48:54 UTC
Permalink
On Feb 9, 3:48 pm, "Sir Kevin Rudd"
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your
families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of
there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the
fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I
think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave
but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here
in Queensland and they actually ADVISE people to
stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water
containers as possible. I would then fill a wheel
barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which
looking at the pics of vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with
sand/dirt. I would then get some large plastic
rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt
across to fill the hole completely at the bottom.
Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will
heat up, but slowly as stone takes a long time to
absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and
chimney it will probably start getting hot even
inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire
itself will start to suck all the air out of the
chimney and with all the smoke it will become hard
to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of
fresh air come in, I would completely wrap the bag
with fresh air covering my entire head, protecting
my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me
fresh oxygen. While this is occuring I would
continue to pour the water I have in the bottles
over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep
me alive for at least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire
burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom
of chimney, get out and look at devastation.
And if by some miracle your house didn't catch fire
your family and dog would at least have a cooked meal.
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 02:08:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I think I would have taken my family the hell out of there a lot
earlier. No way the authorities would wait until the fire was 5
minutes away before declaring an evacuation. No, I think it will be
found that some of the victims were advised to leave but didn't, or
left it so late that they couldn't.
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
Now heres what I would do... fill up as many water containers as possible. I
would then fill a wheel barrow full of dirt and wheel it up to my stone
chimney(this is assuming I have one of course which looking at the pics of
vic houses a lot do).
I would near on fill the base of the chimney with sand/dirt. I would then
get some large plastic rubbish bags fill them with fresh air, seal them off
and put into chimney with the water.
Crawl inside the chimney, and then push the dirt across to fill the hole
completely at the bottom. Now as the fire pushes through, the radiant heat
will be blocked by the stone chimney(and this will heat up, but slowly as
stone takes a long time to absorb heat compared to other materials)
Now as the fire starts to rage around the house and chimney it will probably
start getting hot even inside the chimney itself.... I would then start
pouring the cold water I have over my body. The fire itself will start to
suck all the air out of the chimney and with all the smoke it will become
hard to breath. This is where the plastic bags full of fresh air come in, I
would completely wrap the bag with fresh air covering my entire head,
protecting my eyes and airway from the smoke and giving me fresh oxygen.
While this is occuring I would continue to pour the water I have in the
bottles over me to keep me cool. This should in theory keep me alive for at
least 5 to 10 minutes while the fire burns furiously.
Once the fire front has passed, dig out the bottom of chimney, get out and
look at devastation.
LOL! no wonder you're a Labor voter! But if you did that there would be
one less.
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
GrassyNoel
2009-02-10 02:31:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
No offence, but that's CRAP.
kangarooistan
2009-02-10 05:01:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by GrassyNoel
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
I once saw an advert on TV regarding Bushfires here in Queensland and they
actually ADVISE people to stay at their homes but prepare.
No offence, but that's CRAP.
EXACTLY

But never stay in your house and wait for somebody to come and save
you

The fire front and ember attack will scare the shit out of ANYBODY the
first few times you experience it , its welded permanently into your
brain , if you did not try and run, in which case your probably
dead , but if you took cover for a few minutes you will notice how
quickly the front passes , unless you are on the edge of a forest or
big fuel supply

But it will pass in minutes , and THEN you can quickly extinguish the
odd flames , if you have planned ahead and prepared your property

if you stay inside too long , the small fires will take hold and
destroy your home

After the first few bushfires you will soon learn , if you really do
desire to live in rural districts ,

its best to evacuate the very young and very old if safe to do so ,
but it appears to me , on this occasion , many relied on others to
come and save them , which can not work in fires this big , and must
be never used if you can not defend your home evacuate early
Neil Gerace
2009-02-10 12:00:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by kangarooistan
its best to evacuate the very young and very old if safe to do so ,
Days in advance, it should be safe to do so.

It's best to evacuate everyone when there are fires in the area, whether or not it's obvious they'll be coming towards
you. Otherwise there will be people staying, and dithering until the last minute - well, actually until AFTER the last
minute - and being killed trying to escape when they could have escaped safely days ago.
Post by kangarooistan
but it appears to me , on this occasion , many relied on others to
come and save them , which can not work in fires this big , and must
be never used if you can not defend your home evacuate early
Best to evacuate early anyway, and not hang around to find out whether or not you can actually defend it.
son of a bitch
2009-02-09 07:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
If your going to live in a Forest, you should expect a
fire at any time. Why do these people expect to live in a
forest and not expect to have a fire.
HeadRush
2009-02-09 08:52:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by son of a bitch
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
If your going to live in a Forest, you should expect a
fire at any time. Why do these people expect to live in a
forest and not expect to have a fire.
So with a sea-change you risk drowning to death from a tsunami and with a
tree-change you risk burning to death from a bushfire.

I'm sticking to suburbia.

HR
h***@gmail.com
2009-02-09 09:54:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeadRush
Post by son of a bitch
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
If your going to live in a Forest, you should expect a
fire at any time. Why do these people expect to live in a
forest and not expect to have a fire.
So with a sea-change you risk drowning to death from a tsunami and with a
tree-change you risk burning to death from a bushfire.
I'm sticking to suburbia.
In that case the Lebs will probably get you...
t***@gmail.com
2009-02-09 07:28:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.

A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Kelpie
2009-02-09 07:38:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
That's exactly what I thought. Should be mandatory for all houses in a fire
zone.
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 02:17:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kelpie
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
That's exactly what I thought. Should be mandatory for all houses in a fire
zone.
And the trap door/frame should be constructed as fire doors are and have
a fire rating as they do.
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
olde.sault
2009-02-09 07:47:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
A cellar is a good idea. Growing trees around a house is pretty but
these days, dangerous.

I grew up when there was no such words as "grafiitti" vandals and
"firebugs". Those were times when the school cane straightened out
many criminals-on-the-make. .

There were the teachers who misused their powers and should have been
also punished but most youngsters accepted that they had deserved
punishment and didn't hold that against the world for the rest of
their lives.

Children are coddled and spoil these days so we have suburbs of
defaced walls and such disasters as the present fire in Victoria.

Bring back the cane!

OS
Coach
2009-02-09 07:49:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by olde.sault
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
A cellar is a good idea. Growing trees around a house is pretty but
these days, dangerous.
I grew up when there was no such words as "grafiitti" vandals and
"firebugs". Those were times when the school cane straightened out
many criminals-on-the-make.  .
We also didn't have volunteer fire fighters. You do the math.
Trevor Wilson
2009-02-09 08:51:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
A cellar is a good idea. Growing trees around a house is pretty but
these days, dangerous.

**Depends on the 'trees'. Rainforest types are a good idea, since they
'store' lots of water. They can act as a sacrificial barrier to the heat.
--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
GrassyNoel
2009-02-09 23:39:49 UTC
Permalink
On Feb 9, 5:51 pm, "Trevor Wilson"
Post by Trevor Wilson
**Depends on the 'trees'. Rainforest types are a good idea, since they
'store' lots of water.
They're unlikely to be around in an area that's prone to bushfires.
Mr.T
2009-02-10 07:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by GrassyNoel
Post by Trevor Wilson
**Depends on the 'trees'. Rainforest types are a good idea, since they
'store' lots of water.
They're unlikely to be around in an area that's prone to bushfires.
Yeah, I wonder how many have survived our heat wave and water restrictions?
And how much water they are storing at the moment if there are any.

MrT.
Neil Gerace
2009-02-10 12:01:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by GrassyNoel
They're unlikely to be around in an area that's prone to bushfires.
Plus, rainforest trees don't need to evolve to save water when there's always a lot around. Cacti do that very well,
because they live in deserts.
GrassyNoel
2009-02-09 23:37:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Too bad if a tree has collapsed on top of the trapdoor, or if the
trapdoor's not airtight and burning embers get into the cellar.

Why defend your house at all? It's just 'stuff'. It's replaceable,
especially if you're insured.
Mr.T
2009-02-10 07:41:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Too bad if a tree has collapsed on top of the trapdoor,
You do realise not having trees close to the house is the number ONE rule of
bushfire prone areas?
Post by t***@gmail.com
or if the trapdoor's not airtight and burning embers get into the cellar.
So why bother to build one at all if the design is going to be that stupid?

I did hear one family say their steel trap door was glowing red, and
wondered why you would use metal rather than concrete for example.
But they still survived!

MrT.
Neil Gerace
2009-02-10 12:05:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr.T
Post by t***@gmail.com
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Too bad if a tree has collapsed on top of the trapdoor,
You do realise not having trees close to the house is the number ONE rule of
bushfire prone areas?
But people don't obey rules. You saw on the news, how close the trees were to where the houses had been.

People who live in those areas (I live in Perth, and freely admit that such areas exist here too) like to live amongst
the trees.
Post by Mr.T
Post by t***@gmail.com
or if the trapdoor's not airtight and burning embers get into the cellar.
So why bother to build one at all if the design is going to be that stupid?
Wasn't my idea. Best to just get the hell out of there very early.
John - Melb
2009-02-10 12:23:08 UTC
Permalink
In the situation described by the first poster, I'd be in the pool
with Trevor, if I hadn't "shot through" long before.

Trevor, stay away from the water tank, if they don't burst, the water
boils. Happend to a bloke near my sister's place many years ago,
bugger of a job getting a boiled body out of the tank when the cadaver
keeps falling apart.

In short Trevor, if you were to go into the tank in such a situation,
I'd miss you terribly.
Erik Vastmasd
2009-02-11 06:26:49 UTC
Permalink
I'm almost certain I caught a glimpse of "Neil Gerace
Post by Neil Gerace
Post by Mr.T
Post by t***@gmail.com
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Too bad if a tree has collapsed on top of the trapdoor,
You do realise not having trees close to the house is the number ONE rule of
bushfire prone areas?
But people don't obey rules. You saw on the news, how close the trees were to where the houses had been.
People who live in those areas (I live in Perth, and freely admit that such areas exist here too) like to live amongst
the trees.
I live in a Melbourne suburb but spent many years camping week ends and
annual holidays in our NE Ranges where the fires are currently blazing.

In past years people in fire prone areas used to have a burn off each year
prior to the commencement of the CFA Fire Restrictions in Victoria.
<http://cfaonline.cfa.vic.gov.au/mycfa/Show?pageId=showFrImagePublic>

It is my understanding that now people are no longer permitted to have
their burn off prior to the fire season and there are limitations on what
trees they are able to cut down within their own properties. This has been
attributed to the influence of the greenies.

Our Premier of Victoria, John Brumby has announced there will be a Royal
Commission which hopefully will address a great many concerns.
Post by Neil Gerace
Post by Mr.T
Post by t***@gmail.com
or if the trapdoor's not airtight and burning embers get into the cellar.
So why bother to build one at all if the design is going to be that stupid?
Wasn't my idea. Best to just get the hell out of there very early.
I can't remember which district it was but one story on ABC radio really
touched my heart. A 90 year old woman who apparently lived alone was
released from Hospital just prior to the outbreak of the fires. When fire
fighters reached her home it had been burnt to the ground but she was found
safe in the dam although suffering burns. She is now back in Hospital.
--
Erik
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 02:14:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
The news showed a bloke who had a cellar with a big steel trapdoor: he
went down when the house caught, watched his trapdoor lid glow red,
drank a few bottles of wine while he waited, then came out when it had
cooled down.
A cellar like that is ideal: you can stay in your house - defending it
- until the last possible minute, then bolt for safety if your efforts
fail.
Exactly.
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
Trevor Wilson
2009-02-09 08:49:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but
it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
**Grab some woollen blankets and jump in the pool.
--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
Sir Kevin Rudd
2009-02-09 09:50:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Trevor Wilson
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
**Grab some woollen blankets and jump in the pool.
And what will you do when there is no air for you to breath and the radiant
heat from the fire is scorching your skin off?
Sylvia Else
2009-02-09 11:29:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Trevor Wilson
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
**Grab some woollen blankets and jump in the pool.
And what will you do when there is no air for you to breath and the radiant
heat from the fire is scorching your skin off?
It won't scorch your skin off while said skin is immersed in the pool.
Having some scuba gear handy seems like the go.

Sylvia.
Trevor Wilson
2009-02-09 19:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sylvia Else
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Trevor Wilson
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that
is about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival
was the only thing that mattered?
**Grab some woollen blankets and jump in the pool.
And what will you do when there is no air for you to breath and the
radiant heat from the fire is scorching your skin off?
It won't scorch your skin off while said skin is immersed in the pool.
Having some scuba gear handy seems like the go.
**I usually keep the tank full, so that would be a good idea as well.
--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
Trevor Wilson
2009-02-09 19:34:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Post by Trevor Wilson
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly
pushing through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there
but it appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was
the only thing that mattered?
**Grab some woollen blankets and jump in the pool.
And what will you do when there is no air for you to breath and the
radiant heat from the fire is scorching your skin off?
**I'm in the pool with some blankets. Remember?
--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
Mr.T
2009-02-10 07:34:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Trevor Wilson
**I'm in the pool with some blankets. Remember?
If you're in the pool (assuming a reasonable amount of water, and not an
above ground steel shell one with plastic liner :-), then what are the
blankets for?
Something airtight and fireproof, to create an air bubble, seems like a
better idea if you don't have oxygen tanks.

Frankly I'd rather build an underground cellar, and then I've got somewhere
to store the wine as well. And could drown my sorrows if the house burns
down :-)

I'm amazed how many people didn't at least have wet cotton overalls, and
woollen blankets ready though. Might be a market for Nomex underwear as well
now!

MrT.
Coach
2009-02-10 07:35:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr.T
Post by Trevor Wilson
**I'm in the pool with some blankets. Remember?
If you're in the pool (assuming a reasonable amount of water, and not an
above ground steel shell one with plastic liner :-), then what are the
blankets for?
Something airtight and fireproof, to create an air bubble, seems like a
better idea if you don't have oxygen tanks.
Frankly I'd rather build an underground cellar, and then I've got somewhere
to store the wine as well. And could drown my sorrows if the house burns
down :-)
I'm amazed how many people didn't at least have wet cotton overalls, and
woollen blankets ready though. Might be a market for Nomex underwear as well
now!
Dead people don't normally buy underware of ANY sort.
Trevor Wilson
2009-02-10 08:32:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr.T
Post by Trevor Wilson
**I'm in the pool with some blankets. Remember?
If you're in the pool (assuming a reasonable amount of water, and not an
above ground steel shell one with plastic liner :-), then what are the
blankets for?
**55,000 Litres, 180mm thick concrete, in-ground. The blankets are for
dealing with radiant heat and to perform some filtering of air.
Post by Mr.T
Something airtight and fireproof, to create an air bubble, seems like a
better idea if you don't have oxygen tanks.
**Certainly. I do have SCUBA gear, but I doubt I would have time to grab it
(it would take, maybe, 5 mins).
Post by Mr.T
Frankly I'd rather build an underground cellar, and then I've got somewhere
to store the wine as well. And could drown my sorrows if the house burns
down :-)
**I'm doing that too. The pool will do for now.
Post by Mr.T
I'm amazed how many people didn't at least have wet cotton overalls, and
woollen blankets ready though. Might be a market for Nomex underwear as well
now!
**I keep my woollen blankets close to hand and I am not in a bushfire area.
At least, that is what I think. Nonetheless, I have a plan, just in case. It
cost nothing to make the plan.
--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
Krudd the Dud
2009-02-09 08:54:06 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 9 Feb 2009 16:48:17 +1000, "Sir Kevin Rudd"
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
I would call Flanges Bum, for one of his famous "predictions".
kangarooistan
2009-02-10 00:35:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
.
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
You would implement the fire plan you tested every week every summer ,
all your life , and know how it works cos you saw the fires 10 years
ago and 20 years ago and 30 years ago and 40 years ago and so did your
dad and wife and you have been waiting for years to deal with the fire

Like the giant guns and fortress on Singapore lulled Aussies into
feeling safe and relying on big brother to protect them
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_(helicopter)
"Elvis" is the nickname of an Erickson S-64 Air-Crane Helitanker
(N179AC) which has gained fame in Australia as a highly visible and
valuable tool in bushfire suppression.[1] The helicopter, which can
hold 9,500 litres of water or foam mix, has been brought out by the
Victorian Government from the USA for each fire season since
2001-2002. The

Australians now have been reminded that big brother wont save them

when put to the test they are on their own

By having a million dollar helicopter that will come and save them if
required , many have fallen for the same mistake as in WW2

EVERYBODY must defend their own homes and NOT rely on anybody else

It CAN be done

It is NOT rocket science

Petrol / diesel pumps , tanks , hoses and planning , are only a few
thousand dollars each ,perhaps less than 10% of the cost of a home ,or
less , and it would be self defense dream

The FALSE sense of security portrayed by Elvis / aerial water bombing
and high tech fire brigades seen on TV , has left many to gamble on
being saved by Elvis , and the need to design and install a real fire
plan , perhaps with the neighbors on either side as back up could be
in place in a few days for a few thousand dollars

Like we relied on fortress Singapore in WW2 to save us
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/east_asian_history/118799

If you continue to rely on the army or Elvis / helicopters to save
you , then you are a FOOL , they only protect the ruling elites and
their families

who do you suppose escaped from Singapore when it fell

buy a water pump, tanks , hoses , overalls , boots, hat ,rakes , or
get back to the city where you belong

kanga
======
blofelds_cat
2009-02-10 01:03:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Kevin Rudd
Okay your house is surrounded by a massive bushfire which is quickly pushing
through the area. You could try and drive the car out of there but it
appears the road out is scorched with flames.
Now you have 5 minutes to prepare for the ineviatable fire front that is
about to engulf your home in flames.
What would you do, assuming your survival and your families survival was the
only thing that mattered?
Take them into the cellar stocked with oxygen, water, food, radio, etc.,
that I have prepared for just such an occasion.
--
rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/

"The Rudd packages have to be recognised for what they are- a deadweight cost to the future which will offer negligible improvements in the economy's productivity" -Alan Moran, Institute of Public Affairs

"It took 10 years to pay off Labor's $96 billion debt. How long will it take to pay off Labor's $200 billion debt?" -Malcolm Turnbull
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